Author Archives: Mike Cavaroc

Maintaining the Dark Skies of Jackson Hole

Maintaining the Dark Skies of Jackson Hole

A presentation I’ll be giving about light pollution in Jackson Hole

On Monday, April 28th, 2014, from 6-8pm, I’ll be giving a presentation at the Teton County Library Auditorium, Side B, about light pollution stemming from the town of Jackson. I’ve written about light pollution before, but in writing that blog post, I’ve learned quite a bit more about the effects, solutions, and even goals to achieve by minimizing its effects. In addition, I was also invited onto the board of Wyoming Stargazing, a non-profit that seeks to bring an observatory and planetarium to Jackson Hole, something that won’t be nearly as meaningful without cutting down on the light pollution emitted from the area.

Throughout the presentation, I’ll be showing examples of businesses and areas around town that are doing severe damage to our night skies, how they can very easily fix them, what the effects of light pollution on humans and wildlife are, speaking about International Dark Sky Association certification and why it matters, showing examples of other dark sky communities and how it impacted their tourism, and much more. – Continue reading

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Black Bear Sow Protecting Cub

Grizzly Bear and Spring Wildlife Photography Workshop

Together with Jackson Hole Wildlife Safaris, I’m offering a spring wildlife photography workshop that focuses on finding the apex predators of the region, along with all the other spring offspring flourishing throughout the ecosystem.

We’ll spend the first few days exploring Grand Teton National Park in search of the grizzly bears that have begun to leave their mark on the park while also capturing and taking advantage of all the other wildlife we find along the way. Most of the time will be spent where we encounter grizzlies most often, so much of the attention will go to them, but we will certainly take advantage of other opportunities and sights in between the grizzly bear opportunities.

After a few days in Teton Park, we’ll head up north in search of the famous Yellowstone wolves as well as other grizzlies and abundant wildlife. – Continue reading

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Geminid Meteor Over Gros Ventre River

Night Photography Explored: Part 5 – Meteor Showers

A Geminid Meteor streaks through the sky above the Gros Ventre River in Grand Teton National Park.
Camera: Canon 5D Mark III, Lens: Canon 17-40mm f/4, Aperture: f/4, ISO: 4,000, Shutter Speed: 10sec., Focal Length: 17mm

By contrast to photographing the northern lights, meteor showers are much more predictable for their peak and thus help to be easily planned out to photograph. Predicting exactly when a meteor is going to streak across the sky though is a lot like trying to predict when lightning will strike. This section will help you get the most out of every meteor shower so that you’ll be able to come away with some great shots of shooting stars!

Setting Up

This is where you’ll definitely want to be capturing more sky than land, even if there is moonlight. Your composition can certainly have some distinct silhouettes, or even features if there’s moonlight, but you want the majority of your image to be of the night sky. – Continue reading

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Night Photography Explored – Part 4: Northern Lights

Multiple meteors falls toward the northern horizon of Jackson Hole, Wyoming as northern lights illuminate the night sky above.
Northern lights above Teton Mountains
Camera: Canon 7D, Lens: Sigma 20mm f/1.8 Aperture: f/2.8, ISO: 3,200, Shutter Speed: 20sec. Focal Length: 20mm

The northern lights (aurora borealis; also southern lights for the southern hemisphere, aka, the aurora australis) are one of the most sought-after phenomena in the night sky. Casting bright, colorful lights from above, they have entranced civilizations for countless years. Thanks to digital photography, photographing them has recently become one of the most exciting objects to capture. Unfortunately, few people really know how to take advantage of the opportunity, so hopefully this will help you capture them next time you’re out. The term ‘northern lights’ can be replaced at any point with ‘southern lights’. I’ll use the terms interchangeably. Likewise, I’ll also use auroras where either southern or northern lights could be used. – Continue reading

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Night Photography Explored – Part 3: Moonlight

The Gros Ventre River, frozen from freezing temperatures, flows through Grand Teton National Park.
Camera: Canon 5D Mark III, Lens: Canon 17-40mm f/4, Aperture: f/11, ISO: 3,200, Shutter Speed: 10sec., Focal Length: 17mm

For many night photographers, the moon can be more of a deterrent from proceeding with night shots. Moonlight drowns out many faint stars, as well as the Milky Way. That means that you won’t be capturing bright Milky Way shots filled with an unfathomable amount of stars flooding a night sky. Where it hampers dark sky photography, however, it opens up new landscape possibilities, bringing new life to familiar scenes.

With moonlight, the focus isn’t just on the stars as it was with new moon photography. Instead, you now have the option to compose full landscapes and any sky that’s included will likewise include the brightest stars from the night sky, making it much easier to isolate many constellations. – Continue reading

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Night Photography Explored – Part 2: The Milky Way Galaxy

The Milky Way Galaxy reaches down into the light pollution produced from Jackson, Wyoming as airglow fills the remaining night sky.
Camera: Canon 7D, Lens: Tokina 11-16mm f/2.8, Aperture: f/2.8, ISO: 6,400, Shutter Speed: 30sec., Focal Length: 11mm

For millenia, people have gazed upon the Milky Way Galaxy in awe of its consistent streak through the night sky. It remains the symbol of enigmatic wonderment for both experienced and casual night sky observers. Thus, it is also one of the first night sky objects that people want to photograph, especially if they’ve taken the time to drive out to the middle of nowhere to see it, which leads to the first requirement.

Find a Dark Sky

In order to properly photograph the Milky Way, the first and most important step is to find a dark sky. If you live in a large city, you have some driving to do. – Continue reading

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