Night Photography Explored: Part 5 – Meteor Showers

A Geminid Meteor streaks through the sky above the Gros Ventre River in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. (Mike Cavaroc)
A Geminid Meteor streaks through the sky above the Gros Ventre River in Grand Teton National Park.
Camera: Canon 5D Mark III, Lens: Canon 17-40mm f/4, Aperture: f/4, ISO: 4,000, Shutter Speed: 10sec., Focal Length: 17mm

By contrast to photographing the northern lights, meteor showers are much more predictable for their peak and thus help to be easily planned out to photograph. Predicting exactly when a meteor is going to streak across the sky though is a lot like trying to predict when lightning will strike. This section will help you get the most out of every meteor shower so that you’ll be able to come away with some great shots of shooting stars!

Setting Up

This is where you’ll definitely want to be capturing more sky than land, even if there is moonlight. Your composition can certainly have some distinct silhouettes, or even features if there’s moonlight, but you want the majority of your image to be of the night sky. - Continue reading

Categorized: How To
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Night Photography Explored – Part 3: Moonlight

The Gros Ventre River, frozen from freezing temperatures, flows through Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. (Mike Cavaroc)
The Gros Ventre River, frozen from freezing temperatures, flows through Grand Teton National Park.
Camera: Canon 5D Mark III, Lens: Canon 17-40mm f/4, Aperture: f/11, ISO: 3,200, Shutter Speed: 10sec., Focal Length: 17mm

For many night photographers, the moon can be more of a deterrent from proceeding with night shots. Moonlight drowns out many faint stars, as well as the Milky Way. That means that you won’t be capturing bright Milky Way shots filled with an unfathomable amount of stars flooding a night sky. Where it hampers dark sky photography, however, it opens up new landscape possibilities, bringing new life to familiar scenes.

With moonlight, the focus isn’t just on the stars as it was with new moon photography. Instead, you now have the option to compose full landscapes and any sky that’s included will likewise include the brightest stars from the night sky, making it much easier to isolate many constellations. - Continue reading

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Moving Forward in "Today’s Economy"

The last light of day breaks through clouds and lights up The Sleeping Indian, aka, Sheep Mountain, above Jackson Hole, Wyoming. (Mike Cavaroc)
The last light of January, 2012 breaks through clouds to light up The Sleeping Indian above Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

A full month has officially passed in 2012. How are you resolutions coming along? Are you lulling yourself back into your habitual patterns, or are you moving forward, full-steam ahead with exciting plans to change your life for the better? Many people don’t feel accomplishing your goals is possible because of "today’s economy."

"Today’s economy" is a phrase that I typically avoid because it paints a very bleak picture with little hope for anyone outside of the elite rich. If you look a little closer though, you see much more going on than just businesses all over the country collapsing.

While you certainly do see large businesses taking a significant hit, you also see something amazing happening with individuals: sole proprietors and smaller, locally-owned businesses are thriving! - Continue reading

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The 12 Best Photos from 2011

January Pilgrim Mountain in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming rests under glowing sunset clouds. (Mike Cavaroc)
Pilgrim Mountain in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming rests under glowing sunset clouds.

I found myself rather unproductive in early 2011 in terms of stills. With the recent purchase of a 7D and getting it up to working order, as well as discovering time-lapse photography, my still photography became a bit stagnant. As a result, most of my work was in the form of a time-lapse and before finding a good balance of time-lapse, video and still, I even wondered if I would move entirely into video. Eventually the balance did work itself out and once I had my 7D back and functioning properly the following spring, it was full-steam ahead in every direction!

I discovered this image during that time after forgetting about it. I was looking back through a day in January where I hadn’t shot very much at all, but saw potential in a nice sunset above Pilgrim Mountain. - Continue reading

Categorized: Article, Landscape, Panorama, Video, Wildlife
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Teton Changes – Video of Fall in Grand Teton National Park


A video compilation of fall landscapes and wildlife in and around Jackson Hole, WY and Grand Teton National Park.

I’ll be leaving on a road trip soon and before I left, I wanted to get all my fall video compiled together into one video. While I didn’t get to use all the clips I wanted to, I still thought that it came out nicely.

The song I used, by Epic Soul Factory, was perfect until it hit a bit of a change of mood. I didn’t have enough clips to account for the short, dark section, so I had to edit the song just a bit so it would fit what I was trying to do. For that, I apologize to the original artist.

Regardless, this should give you a little glimpse into the area in the fall season. Wildlife comes out more in preparation for the winter, as fall leaves rest below snow-capped peaks all across the valley. - Continue reading

Categorized: Video
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Storm Clouds Over Jackson Hole After Sunset

The Sleeping Indian (aka, Sheep Mountain) rests beneath storm clouds passing over Jackson Hole, Wyoming. (Mike Cavaroc)
The Sleeping Indian (aka, Sheep Mountain) rests beneath storm clouds passing over Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

Most people interested in photography begin to learn that sunset is the best time of day to shoot. While most would like to get up for sunrise, many don’t. They also begin to learn why mid-day shooting is the hardest light to shoot in and thus, will work sunset into their day as the optimal time of day to shoot.

The light is certainly ideal then, but in reality, if there’s light, there’s something to shoot. One of the most underrated times to shoot, especially with cooperative weather in the area, is actually after sunset. When the last pastel hues have faded from the clouds, you’ll see the majority of people packing up their gear and heading in. Some of the most interesting shots however, can come when all that’s left is atmospheric light produced from the end of the day reflecting off clouds. - Continue reading

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