Spring Wildlife Photography Workshop Wrap-Up

Grizzly Bear #399 watching sunrise with her cubs, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming (Mike Cavaroc)
Grizzly Bear #399 watches sunrise over Grand Teton National Park as her cubs graze.

This past Friday, we wrapped up our first annual Grizzly Bear and Spring Wildlife Photography Workshop. There were two workshops spanning five days each scouring both Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks for grizzly bears, wolves, black bears, bison calves, and all the other wildlife that calls Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks home. Though I was out recovering from a nasty virus for the first workshop, I was able to lead the second one, both coming out a huge success! Due to my absence from the first workshop, this will be a summary of the second workshop, though I was told the first week was able to find a whopping 38 different bears!

Black bear cub running through a meadow, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming (Mike Cavaroc)
Black bear cub running through a meadow, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

For the second week, we started our drive from Jackson on Antelope Flats in Grand Teton National Park immersed in a healthy bison herd with the Teton Mountains providing a dramatic backdrop.
Continue reading

Categorized: JH Wildlife Safaris, Photo Workshop, Travel Logs
Tagged: , , , , , , , , ,

Grizzly Bear and Spring Wildlife Photography Workshop

Together with Jackson Hole Wildlife Safaris, I’m offering a spring wildlife photography workshop that focuses on finding the apex predators of the region, along with all the other spring offspring flourishing throughout the ecosystem.

We’ll spend the first few days exploring Grand Teton National Park in search of the grizzly bears that have begun to leave their mark on the park while also capturing and taking advantage of all the other wildlife we find along the way. Most of the time will be spent where we encounter grizzlies most often, so much of the attention will go to them, but we will certainly take advantage of other opportunities and sights in between the grizzly bear opportunities.

After a few days in Teton Park, we’ll head up north in search of the famous Yellowstone wolves as well as other grizzlies and abundant wildlife.
Continue reading

Categorized: JH Wildlife Safaris, Photo Workshop, Video
Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Night Photography Explored – Part 4: Northern Lights

Multiple meteors falls toward the northern horizon of Jackson Hole, Wyoming as northern lights illuminate the night sky above. (Mike Cavaroc)
Multiple meteors falls toward the northern horizon of Jackson Hole, Wyoming as northern lights illuminate the night sky above.
Northern lights above Teton Mountains
Camera: Canon 7D, Lens: Sigma 20mm f/1.8 Aperture: f/2.8, ISO: 3,200, Shutter Speed: 20sec. Focal Length: 20mm

The northern lights (aurora borealis; also southern lights for the southern hemisphere, aka, the aurora australis) are one of the most sought-after phenomena in the night sky. Casting bright, colorful lights from above, they have entranced civilizations for countless years. Thanks to digital photography, photographing them has recently become one of the most exciting objects to capture. Unfortunately, few people really know how to take advantage of the opportunity, so hopefully this will help you capture them next time you’re out. The term ‘northern lights’ can be replaced at any point with ‘southern lights’. I’ll use the terms interchangeably.
Continue reading

Categorized: How To
Tagged: , , , , , , , ,

12 Favorite Photos from 2013

January
Mountain lion kittens sit cautiously behind their mother in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. (Mike Cavaroc)
Mountain lion kittens sit cautiously behind their mother in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming.

Certainly one of the most exciting moments of the year was when I found myself sharing a trail with cougars. This was not just the first time I had ever seen wild cougars, it was the first time I had ever seen wild cats at all. The excitement I felt in the moment was overwhelming, and equally was the disappointment when they began to run away. Taking ample time to fully immerse myself in the scene, and not just grab a few shots, it became a defining moment that I will not soon forget.

February
A coyote quietly sneaks through snow and sagebrush in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. (Mike Cavaroc)
A coyote quietly sneaks through snow and sagebrush in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.

Yellowstone always provides a great getaway during the winter. Plenty of wildlife scours the blanket of snow for traces of food during the harsh winters, much of it unconcerned if a road crosses its path.
Continue reading

Categorized: Article
Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Rewilding the Earth and Human Evolution


George Monbiot speaks about the rewilding process at a TED conference and why it is so essential that we begin to take it seriously.
[NOTE: If the video does not display, please try reloading]

In a brilliantly fantastic TED talk, George Monbiot breaks down the trophic cascade from the gray wolf and even takes it a step further as he cites other examples of ecosystems where similar effects have been lost. He then proceeds to discuss the "rewilding" process, a process by which we follow the Yellowstone wolf example and begin to reestablish ecosystems that have long since been decimated. One way or another, however, nature will once and for all force us into learning to coexist with it.

During the last century, humanity has had an extraordinary leap in its awareness and consciousness. Long gone are the days where it was standard practice to kill animals that got in your way or even met you on the trail.
Continue reading

Categorized: Article, Wildlife
Tagged: , , , , ,

How to Turn Innocent Wolves Into Public Enemies

The gray wolf, 755M, licks his mouth after eating on a carcass in the Lamar Valley of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. (Mike Cavaroc)
The gray wolf, 755M, licks his mouth after eating on a carcass in the Lamar Valley of Yellowstone National Park.

On Monday, August 19 of 2013, shocking news was reported that the Pine Creek Pack of wolves was held responsible for the deaths of 176 domestic sheep the weekend prior. The reports coming out were startling, and rightfully so. It wound up becoming the largest death of sheep in Idaho’s history. Most news outlets reported that the wolves caused it and it was case closed. Consequently, 13 wolves in the pack, nine of them pups, were put to death and the pileup was left out to lure in other predators to their death as well. The incident may be true and it may not be. The fact is there is a deeper story underneath the surface that begs to be explored.
Continue reading

Categorized: Article, Wildlife
Tagged: , , , ,